My Blog

Posts for: November, 2021

By Dr. Vincent A Grosso, II
November 20, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
DentalHygieneandCareCriticalDuringCancerTreatment

After months or even years of radiation or chemotherapy, the words "cancer-free" is music to your ears. Your joy and relief, though, may be tempered by the toll these treatments can take on the rest of your body—including your mouth.

Both of these treatments can destroy healthy tissue along with targeted cancer cells. If the focus has been on the head and neck regions, they could damage the salivary glands to the point that they won't produce adequate saliva flow.

A lack of saliva can have a detrimental effect on your oral health. Saliva buffers and helps lower oral acid levels that soften and erode enamel and increase the likelihood of tooth decay. Saliva also supplies antibodies that fight disease-causing bacteria. Otherwise, bacteria—and the risk for disease—can rapidly grow.

If these or other scenarios occur, you may experience dental damage, even tooth loss. Fortunately, we can restore an injured smile in various ways, including dentures, bridges or dental implants. But we should also attempt to limit the potential damage by taking steps to prevent dental disease during cancer treatment.

The most important of these is to brush and floss daily. Everyone should practice these hygiene tasks to remove disease-causing dental plaque, regardless of their health status. But because some natural disease-fighting mechanisms in the mouth may be disrupted during either radiation or chemotherapy, it's even more important if you're a cancer patient.

It's equally important to maintain as much as possible regular dental visits during cancer treatment. Dental cleanings provided during these visits remove any residual plaque and tartar (hardened plaque), which further lowers your disease risk.

Your dentist can better monitor your overall dental condition during frequent visits and provide as much treatment as you can tolerate. They can also enhance your protection against disease by prescribing antibacterial mouthrinses, fluoride applications or products to boost saliva production.

Some teeth and gum problems may be unavoidable; in that case, you may need post-treatment dental care to restore your oral health as needed. But caring as much for your dental health as you're able during cancer treatment could help you realize a better outcome.

If you would like more information on dental care during cancer treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Dr. Vincent A Grosso, II
November 12, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures

Do you have a tooth problem causing you pain or discomfort? Dr. Vincent Grosso of Grosso Dental in Kissimmee, FL, is here to offer you the right treatment. The dentist will examine you comprehensively to determine whether a root canal treatment or extraction is right for you.

When Is Root Canal Treatment Recommended?

A root canal is recommended when the pulp is damaged by an infection due to decay, crack, chip in the tooth, or faulty crown. However, this procedure can only work if the infection is not established. 

When Is Tooth Extraction Recommended?

A dentist might recommend a tooth extraction when nothing can be done to save the tooth. For example, if a tooth has developed a large cavity that greatly compromises its structure, it can be impossible to repair it. In such a case, extraction is the only option. 

Which Of the Two Procedures Is Better?

Both root extraction and root canal treatment in Kissimmee, FL are effective in dealing with various problems affecting teeth. No method is better than the other. Your dentist will examine your condition accordingly to determine which of them is most suitable. They will also explain why they chose the procedure and answer any questions you might have.

Root Canal Procedure

When you go to the dentist for a root canal procedure, they start by numbing the tooth and the surrounding area. They then create a tiny opening into the affected tooth to expose the canal. They can use tools like a microscope to have a better view of the canal if need be. 

From there, the dentist removes the damaged tissue from the canal, then cleans and disinfects it. The canal is then filled with a biocompatible material, which protects it from infection. The tooth can also be filled with a crown or filling to restore its normal appearance and function. You may feel some discomfort after the procedure, but that shouldn’t worry you as it goes away after some time. 

Tooth Extraction Procedure

Just like in the tooth canal procedure, the dentist will first numb your teeth as the first step of tooth extraction. From there, they use some specialized equipment to loosen the tooth and pull it out. You might feel some pressure during the procedure and bleed lightly after. The dentist will give you a piece of gaze to bite for around 45 minutes after the procedure. You may also experience pain a few days after the procedure. The dentist will recommend some pain killer to relieve the pain until you are healed. 

Sometimes, determining whether a root canal treatment or extraction will solve your dental problems is not easy. However, you don’t have to worry; Dr.  Grosso of Grosso Dental in Kissimmee, FL, will help you know which procedure is most suitable after a thorough evaluation. Call (407) 350-5969 to book an appointment.


By Dr. Vincent A Grosso, II
November 10, 2021
Category: Oral Health
OlympiansPoleVaultingAccidentPutstheSpotlightonDentalInjuries

British pole vaulter Harry Coppell had an unpleasant mishap right before the Tokyo Olympic games. During a training vault, Coppell glanced the top bar to loosen it, which then fell on top of his face on the mat. The impact broke one of his front teeth nearly in two and severely damaged others.

Coppell posted the accident on Instagram, along with a photo of the aftermath. "I hope @tokyo2020 has a good dentist around," he quipped in the caption. Alas, after several hours with a dentist, one of the injured teeth couldn't be saved, although the chipped tooth remained. Needless to say, the Olympian's smile took a beating along with his teeth.

Fortunately, through the marvels of cosmetic dentistry, Coppell can eventually regain his attractive smile. Still, though, his experience is a blunt reminder that sports and other physical activities do carry some risk for dental injury, especially for active young adults and children.

A chipped tooth is the most common outcome of a traumatic dental injury, but not the only one: you might also suffer from a displaced, loosened or even knocked-out tooth. And, even if the teeth don't appear injured after face trauma, there could be underlying gum and bone damage that requires prompt emergency care from a dentist.

Of course, preventing a dental injury is far better than treating one that has occurred—and wearing an athletic mouthguard is your best bet for dodging such a bullet. A mouthguard's soft plastic helps absorb the force of a hard impact so that the teeth and gums don't. This important protective gear is a must for anyone who plays sports like football or basketball, or enjoys physical activities like trail biking.

When it comes to mouthguards, you have two general categories from which to choose. The first is called a "boil and bite," often found online or in sporting goods stores. These usually come in general sizes that can be customized further by softening in hot water and then having the wearer bite down while it's soft (hence the name). This personalizes the guard to fit the individual wearer.

The other category is a custom mouthguard created by a dentist from an impression of the wearer's mouth. Because of this specialized fit, custom mouthguards aren't usually as bulky as boil and bites, and are typically more comfortable to wear.

The key point, though, is that a mouthguard can help you avoid a serious dental injury, regardless of which category you choose. It could mean the difference between a forgettable incident or dental damage that could impact your life for years to come.

If you would like more information about preventing and treating dental injuries, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Athletic Mouthguards.”